• Author: Asaṅga Translator: Karl Brunnhölzl

    Winner of the Khyentse Foundation Prize for Outstanding Translation. The first complete English translation of Asaṅga's Mahāyānasaṃgraha, the most important and comprehensive Indian Yogācāra text, and all its available Indian commentaries. The Mahāyānasaṃgraha, published here with its Indian and Tibetan commentaries in three volumes, presents virtually everything anybody might want to know about the Yogācāra School of mahāyāna Buddhism. It discusses in detail the nature and operation of the eight kinds of consciousness, the often-misunderstood notion of “mind only” (cittamātra), dependent origination, the cultivation of the path and its fruition in terms of the four wisdoms, and the three bodies (kāyas) of a buddha. Volume 1 presents the translation of the Mahāyānasaṃgraha along with a commentary by Vasubandhu. The introduction gives an overview of the text and its Indian and Tibetan commentaries, and explains in detail two crucial elements of the Yogācāra view: the ālaya-consciousness and the afflicted mind (kliṣṭamanas). Volume 2 presents translations of the commentary by Asvabhāva and an anonymous Indian commentary on the first chapter of the text. These translations are supplemented in the endnotes by excerpts from Tibetan commentaries and related passages in other Indian and Chinese Yogācāra works. Volume 3 includes appendices with excerpts from other Indian and Chinese Yogācāra texts and supplementary materials on major Yogācāra topics in the Mahāyānasaṃgraha.   Also available as an eBook for Apple and Android devices. Note that the hardcopy book is shipped from the US. International customers may wish to explore local booksellers or Amazon.com to save on shipping cost.
  • A commentary by Āchārya Lama Tenpa Gyaltsen
  • New!

    (A set of two volumes; print books)

    This is the sourcebook for Nitartha Summer Institute 2022 course: BUD 630 BUDDHA NATURE: LUMINOUS HEART OF THE TATHĀGATA
    This sourcebook was produced from a series of talks given by Āchārya Lama Tenpa Gyaltsen at Nītārtha Institute, Gampo Abbey, Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia, Canada, in August and September 1998, and by a series of talks given by Mitra Dr. Karl Brunnhölzl at Nītārtha Institute, Nalanda West, Seattle, Washington, United States, September, October, and November 2018.
  • Buddha Nature: The Mahayana Uttaratantra Shastra with Commentary by Maitreya, Jamgön Kongtrül Lodrö Tayé and Khenpo Tsültrim Gyamtso Rinpoche

    Author: Arya Maitreya Commentary: Jamgön Kongtrül Lodrö Tayé and Khenpo Tsültrim Gyamtso Rinpoche Translator: Rosemary Fuchs

    All sentient beings, without exception, have buddha nature—the inherent purity and perfection of the mind, untouched by changing mental states. Thus there is neither any reason for conceit nor self-contempt. This is obscured by veils that are removable and do not touch the inherent purity and perfection of the nature of the mind. The Mahayana Uttaratantra Shastra, one of the “Five Treatises” said to have been dictated to Asanga by the Bodhisattva Maitreya, presents the Buddha’s definitive teachings on how we should understand this ground of enlightenment and clarifies the nature and qualities of buddhahood. This seminal text details with great clarity the view that forms the basis for Vajrayana, and especially Mahamudra, practice. Also available as an eBook for Apple or Android devices. Note that the hardcopy book is shipped from the US. International customers may wish to explore local booksellers or Amazon.com to save on shipping cost.
  • One hundred and thirteen definition flashcards drawn from the Classifications of Mind root text. English, Tibetan, and Sanskrit translations included.
  • Translator: Karl Brunnhölzl

    A root text written by Khenpo Tsültrim Gyamtso Rinpoche. It presents the divisions and definitions of the types of mind identified in the epistemological tradition of Dignāga and Dharmakīrti. Also available as an eBook for Apple or Android devices.
  • Translator: Ari Goldfield

    A root text by Khenpo Tsültrim Gyamtso Rinpoche. It presents the divisions and definitions logic, and what constitutes valid and invalid reasoning as presented in the tradition of Dignāga and Dharmakīrti.
  • Ninety six definition flashcards drawn from the Collected Topics root text. English, Tibetan, and Sanskrit translations included.
  • Translator: Karl Brunnhölzl

    A root text compiled by Acharya Lama Tenpa Gyaltsen. It presents the divisions and definitions of objects as presented in the abhidharma tradition of Vasubandhu.   Available in print and as an eBook for Apple or Android devices.
  • The commentary, Feast for the Fortunate, is the ninth Karmapa’s abridgement of the eighth Karmapa, Mikyö Dorje’s masterpiece, The Chariot of the Takpo Kagyü Siddhas. In it readers will find previously unavailable material on the Karmapa’s Middle Way view and a rare window into a philosophically charged era of Middle Way exposition in Tibetan Buddhism. Wangchuk Dorje’s comprehensive commentary on the Indian master Chandrakirti’s seminal text, the Madhyamakavatara, is marked by eloquent poetry, vigorous and extensive analysis, and heart instructions on breaking through the veils of confusion to independently experience the true nature of things. Includes root text and commentary by the ninth Karmapa Rangjung Dorje, translated by Tyler Dewar.
  • A commentary by Acharya Sherab Gyaltsen

    Root verses and commentary on An Exposition Of The Presentation of the Philosophical Systems of the Great Vehicle An Exposition that Reveals the Presentation of the Philosophical Systems of the Chittamatrikas of the Great Vehicle by Dzogchen Ponlop Rinpoche. Translated by Karl Brunnhölzl, Tyler Dewar, and Scott Wellenbach.
  • Commentary by Dzogchen Ponlop Rinpoche

    This series explicates one of the principal Indian classics of the Madhyamaka tradition, Chandrakirti’s Madhyamakavatara (Entrance to the Middle Way), along with the Kagyü commentary by the eighth Karmapa, The Chariot of the Dakpo Kagyüs. These transcripts cover the Madhyamakavatara’s eleven chapters, which correlate with the ten bhumis (grounds) and the ten paramitas (perfections), plus the ultimate bhumi of buddhahood. The focus is particularly on the sixth chapter of the Madhyamakavatara, which discusses prajna (transcendental knowledge) and its realization of emptiness. Main topics include the selflessness of phenomena and the individual, and the impossibility of finding a self anywhere with the range of phenomenal experience. Includes root text by Chandrakirti and commentary by Mikyö Dorje, translated by Elizabeth M. Callahan.
  • Commentary by Dzogchen Ponlop Rinpoche

    This series explicates one of the principal Indian classics of the Madhyamaka tradition, Chandrakirti’s Madhyamakavatara (Entrance to the Middle Way), along with the Kagyü commentary by the eighth Karmapa, The Chariot of the Dakpo Kagyüs. These transcripts cover the Madhyamakavatara’s eleven chapters, which correlate with the ten bhumis (grounds) and the ten paramitas (perfections), plus the ultimate bhumi of buddhahood. The focus is particularly on the sixth chapter of the Madhyamakavatara, which discusses prajna (transcendental knowledge) and its realization of emptiness. Main topics include the selflessness of phenomena and the individual, and the impossibility of finding a self anywhere with the range of phenomenal experience. Includes root text by Chandrakirti and commentary by Mikyö Dorje, translated by Elizabeth M. Callahan.
  • Commentary by Acharya Sherab Gyaltsen. Root Text Translation by Ari Goldfield. Oral Translation by Elizabeth M. Callahan. This transcript was produced from a series of talks given by Acharya Sherab Gyaltsen at Nitartha Institute, Gampo Abbey, Nova Scotia, Canada, in June and July 1997.
  • Translator: Karl Brunnhölzl

    An extraordinary collection of writings on buddha nature by the Third Karmapa Rangjung Dorje (1284-1339). The Third Karmapa Rangjung Dorje’s unique and balanced view synthesizes Yogācāra Madhyamaka and the classical teachings on buddha nature. His work focuses on the transition from ordinary deluded consciousness to enlightened wisdom, the characteristics of buddhahood, and a buddha’s enlightened activity. Included are commentaries by Jamgön Kongtrul Lodrö Tayé that supplement the view of the Third Karmapa on two fundamental treatises on buddha nature, emphasizing the luminous empty mind of buddha nature as presented by the great Indian masters Maitreya and Asaṅga. For those practicing the sutrayāna and the vajrayāna in the Kagyü tradition, what these texts describe can be transformed into living experience. Available as an eBook for Apple and Android devices. Note that the hardcopy book is shipped from the US. International customers may wish to explore local booksellers or Amazon.com to save on shipping cost.
  • eBook for Android and Apple available!

    The Mahāyāna Uttaratantra Shāstra: Fourth Vajra Point: The Element – What is to Be Realized

    Author: Jamgön Kongtrul Lodrö Thayé Translators: Rosemarie Fuchs and Michele Martin

    A root text written by Jamgön Kongtrul Lodrö Thayé. It systematically presents the view of budda nature tradition as formulated in the fourth vajra point of Maitreya’s Uttaratantra. Also available as an eBook for Android and Apple devices.
  • Mind and Its World I begins a detailed analysis of the subjective side of experience. It examines mind and how it perceives its world in valid and invalid ways based on the Classifications of Mind, which provides divisions and definitions of the types of mind identified in the epistemological tradition of Dignaga and Dharmakirti. The key point is the discernment of the aspects of mind that validly perceive things the way they are, which are distinguished from those aspects of mind that are mistaken and tainted by fundamental delusion, and thus keep one bound in samsara. It also introduces the two Hinayana philosophical systems, the Vaibhashika and Sautrantika schools, covering the two truths and the process of perception. Selected readings, analytical meditations, study questions, review summaries are included in the sourcebook. Also available as an eBook for Apple or Android devices.
  • Mind and Its World II examines the theme of karma. It begins the study of causes and conditions as presented in Collected Topics, the twelve nidanas, or chain of interdependent origination, and the distinction between primary minds and mental factors. It includes a detailed presentation of the mental factors from the Classifications of Mind. Selected readings, analytical meditations, study questions, and review summaries are included in the sourcebook. Also available as an eBook for Apple or Android devices.
  • Mind and Its World III first concludes the investigation into causes and results as presented in Collected Topics. It then turns to the analysis of the ways in which mind cognizes phenomena, particularly the ways in which conceptuality functions, by investigating the modes of engagement from Classifications of Mind and the methods that lead to cognition from Collected Topics. Selected readings, analytical meditations, study questions, and review summaries are included in the sourcebook. Also available as an eBook for Apple or Android devices.
  • This sourcebook offers a systematic presentation of the Mind Only (Cittamātra) tenet system, one of the principal Mahāyāna philosophical schools. The Mind Only school emphasizes the doctrine that the subjective and objective poles of perception are not different in substance, but mental in nature. Specific topics include discussions on perception, the fundamental notion of “mind only,” the three natures, self-awareness, and the all-base consciousness. Also included is a brief discussion of the paths and the fruition. Selected readings, analytical meditations, study questions, and review charts are included in the sourcebook. Includes root text written by Acharya Lama Tenpa Gyaltsen.
  • EBook available!

    Commentary by Dzogchen Ponlop Rinpoche Oral translation by Tyler Dewar Root text translation by Gregory Forgues From the English translation by the Buddhavacana Translation Group, under the patronage and supervision of 84000: Translating the Words of the Buddha

    A transcript of the oral commentary by Dzogchen Ponlop Rinpoche on the sūtra Unraveling the Intent [of the Buddha], a crucial sūtra for the Yogācāra tradition. In this text, Rinpoche presents with great clarity and detail the prologue and first five sūtra's chapters, which deal with the five defining characteristics of ultimate reality as well as the presentation of the all-base consciousness.
    Also available as an eBook for Android  and Apple.
  • Traducción del tibetano al inglés por Karl Brunnhölzl Traducción del inglés al español por Israel Lifshitz

    Un texto raíz escrito por Khenpo Tsültrim Gyamtso Rinpoche. Presenta las divisiones y definiciones de los tipos de mente identificados en la tradición epistemológica de Dignāga y Dharmakīrti.

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