• Translator: Dr. Mitra Karl Brunnhölzl

    A root text compiled by Acharya Lama Tenpa Gyaltsen. It presents the divisions and definitions of objects as presented in the abhidharma tradition of Vasubandhu.   Available in print and as an eBook for Apple or Android devices.
  • Mind and Its World I begins a detailed analysis of the subjective side of experience. It examines mind and how it perceives its world in valid and invalid ways based on the Classifications of Mind, which provides divisions and definitions of the types of mind identified in the epistemological tradition of Dignaga and Dharmakirti. The key point is the discernment of the aspects of mind that validly perceive things the way they are, which are distinguished from those aspects of mind that are mistaken and tainted by fundamental delusion, and thus keep one bound in samsara. It also introduces the two Hinayana philosophical systems, the Vaibhashika and Sautrantika schools, covering the two truths and the process of perception. Selected readings, analytical meditations, study questions, review summaries are included in the sourcebook. Also available as an eBook for Apple or Android devices.
  • Translator: Dr. Mitra Karl Brunnhölzl

    A root text written by Khenpo Tsültrim Gyamtso Rinpoche. It presents the divisions and definitions of the types of mind identified in the epistemological tradition of Dignāga and Dharmakīrti. Also available as an eBook for Apple or Android devices.
  • Author: Acharya Lama Tenpa Gyaltsen Translators: Kimberly Colwell and Marcus Perman

    Root text written by Acharya Lama Tenpa Gyaltsen. It presents the divisions and definitions of the Mind Only philosophical system.
    • Also available as an eBook for Apple or Android devices.

    Author: Acharya Lama Tenpa Gyaltsen

    A presentation of the philosophical tenets of the Madhyamaka tradition of the Mahayana. Based on sections of Jamgön Kongtrul’s Lodrö Thaye’s Treasury of Knowledge, this text focuses on the Madhyamaka presentation of the two truths, the views of the subschools of the tradition (Prasangika and Svatantrika), and the fundamental understanding of emptiness. Includes root text and commentary by Jamgön Kongtrul Lodrö Thaye, translated by Karl Brunnhölzl.    
  • This version is for Self-Paced Online Course (SPOC) only. The UPDATED version for non Self-Paced Online Course will be available in the Fall 2023.

    Mind and Its World III first concludes the investigation into causes and results as presented in Collected Topics. It then turns to the analysis of the ways in which mind cognizes phenomena, particularly the ways in which conceptuality functions, by investigating the modes of engagement from Classifications of Mind and the methods that lead to cognition from Collected Topics. Selected readings, analytical meditations, study questions, and review summaries are included in the sourcebook. Also available as an eBook for Apple or Android devices.
  • This sourcebook offers a systematic presentation of the Mind Only (Cittamātra) tenet system, one of the principal Mahāyāna philosophical schools. The Mind Only school emphasizes the doctrine that the subjective and objective poles of perception are not different in substance, but mental in nature. Specific topics include discussions on perception, the fundamental notion of “mind only,” the three natures, self-awareness, and the all-base consciousness. Also included is a brief discussion of the paths and the fruition. Selected readings, analytical meditations, study questions, and review charts are included in the sourcebook. Includes root text written by Acharya Lama Tenpa Gyaltsen.
    • Available as an eBook for Apple and Android devices.
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    Translator: Dr. Mitra Karl Brunnhölzl

    An extraordinary collection of writings on buddha nature by the Third Karmapa Rangjung Dorje (1284-1339). The Third Karmapa Rangjung Dorje’s unique and balanced view synthesizes Yogācāra Madhyamaka and the classical teachings on buddha nature. His work focuses on the transition from ordinary deluded consciousness to enlightened wisdom, the characteristics of buddhahood, and a buddha’s enlightened activity. Included are commentaries by Jamgön Kongtrul Lodrö Tayé that supplement the view of the Third Karmapa on two fundamental treatises on buddha nature, emphasizing the luminous empty mind of buddha nature as presented by the great Indian masters Maitreya and Asaṅga. For those practicing the sutrayāna and the vajrayāna in the Kagyü tradition, what these texts describe can be transformed into living experience.  
  • Commentary by Dzogchen Ponlop Rinpoche Oral translation by Mitra Tyler Dewar Root text translation by Gregory Forgues From the English translation by the Buddhavacana Translation Group, under the patronage and supervision of 84000: Translating the Words of the Buddha

    A transcript of the oral commentary by Dzogchen Ponlop Rinpoche on the sūtra Unraveling the Intent [of the Buddha], a crucial sūtra for the Yogācāra tradition. In this text, Rinpoche presents with great clarity and detail the prologue and first five sūtra's chapters, which deal with the five defining characteristics of ultimate reality as well as the presentation of the all-base consciousness.
    Also available as an eBook for Android  and Apple.
  • Mind and Its World II examines the theme of karma. It begins the study of causes and conditions as presented in Collected Topics, the twelve nidanas, or chain of interdependent origination, and the distinction between primary minds and mental factors. It includes a detailed presentation of the mental factors from the Classifications of Mind. Selected readings, analytical meditations, study questions, and review summaries are included in the sourcebook. Also available as an eBook for Apple or Android devices.
    • Also available as an eBook for Android  and Apple devices.

    Author: Jamgön Kongtrul Lodrö Thayé Translator: Karl Brunnhölzl

    A root text based on sections of Jamgön Kongtrul Lodrö Thaye’s Treasury of Knowledge. It systematically presents the Madhyamaka view of the two truths, the assertions of the subschools of the tradition, and formulates the emptiness reasonings.  
  • eBook available!

    A Commentary by Acharya Lama Tenpa Gyaltsen and Karl Brunnhölzl

    This is a newly updated sourcebook, a set of two volumes, produced from a series of talks given by Acharya Lama Tenpa Gyaltsen at Nītārtha Institute, Gampo Abbey, Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia, Canada, in August and September 1998, and by a series of talks given by Karl Brunnhölzl at Nītārtha Institute, Nalanda West, Seattle, Washington, United States, September, October, and November 2018.

    Available as eBook:

     
  • NOTE: For shipping within the US only. One hundred and thirteen definition flashcards drawn from the Classifications of Mind root text. English, Tibetan, and Sanskrit translations included.
  • ROOT TEXT

    Madhyamaka is a potent and universally accessible means of calming our suffering and awakening to our innate wisdom. The Center of the Sunlit Sky artfully rescues this brilliant teaching from its unwarranted reputation for intellectual opacity and reinstates it as a supremely practical tool kit for everyday living. The aim of this book is to take Madhyamaka out of the purely intellectual corner into which it unjustly gets boxed. It is an attempt to show how Madhayamaka actually addresses and works with all of our experiences in life. The book follows the original Indian sources as well as the standard commentaries on Madhyamaka in the Kagyu School of Tibetan Buddhism. At the same time, these materials are adapted for a contemporary audience, combining the familiar sharpness of Madhyamaka reasonings (launching a massive assault on our cherished belief systems) with exploring the practical relevance of the Madhyamaka way of mind training. Also available as an eBook for Kindle devices. Note that the hardcopy book is shipped from the US. International customers may wish to explore local booksellers or Amazon.com to save on shipping cost.
  • NOTE: For shipping within the US only. Ninety six definition flashcards drawn from the Collected Topics root text. English, Tibetan, and Sanskrit translations included.
  • This is the updated Mind and Its World 3 Sourcebook for semester course and Summer Institute (not for Self-Paced Online Course). E-book may be available in 2024.

    Mind and Its World III first concludes the investigation into causes and results as presented in Collected Topics. It then turns to the analysis of the ways in which mind cognizes phenomena, particularly the ways in which conceptuality functions, by investigating the modes of engagement from Classifications of Mind and the methods that lead to cognition from Collected Topics. Selected readings, analytical meditations, study questions, and review summaries are included in the sourcebook.
    • The hardcopy book is shipped from the US. International customers may wish to explore local booksellers, Shambala Publications, or Amazon to save on shipping cost.

    Author: Dr. Mitra Karl Brunnhölzl

    Mining for Wisdom within Delusion: Maitreya's "Distinction between Phenomena and the Nature of Phenomena" and Its Indian and Tibetan Commentaries

    Maitreya’s Distinction between Phenomena and the Nature of Phenomena distinguishes the illusory phenomenal world of saṃsāra produced by the confused dualistic mind from the ultimate reality that is mind’s true nature. The transition from the one to the other is the process of “mining for wisdom within delusion.” Maitreya’s text calls this “the fundamental change,” which refers to the vanishing of delusive appearances through practicing the path, thus revealing the underlying changeless nature of these appearances. In this context, the main part of the text consists of the most detailed explanation of nonconceptual wisdom—the primary driving force of the path as well as its ultimate result—in Buddhist literature. The introduction of the book discusses these two topics (fundamental change and nonconceptual wisdom) at length and shows how they are treated in a number of other Buddhist scriptures. The three translated commentaries, by Vasubandhu, the Third Karmapa, Rangjung Dorje, and Gö Lotsāwa, as well as excerpts from all other available commentaries on Maitreya’s text, put it in the larger context of the Indian Yogācāra School and further clarify its main themes. They also show how this text is not a mere scholarly document, but an essential foundation for practicing both the sūtrayāna and the vajrayāna and thus making what it describes a living experience. The book also discusses the remaining four of the five works of Maitreya, their transmission from India to Tibet, and various views about them in the Tibetan tradition.
  • Translator: Ari Goldfield

    A root text by Khenpo Tsültrim Gyamtso Rinpoche. It presents the divisions and definitions logic, and what constitutes valid and invalid reasoning as presented in the tradition of Dignāga and Dharmakīrti.
  • Commentary by Acharya Sherab Gyaltsen. Root Text Translation by Ari Goldfield. Oral Translation by Elizabeth M. Callahan. This transcript was produced from a series of talks given by Acharya Sherab Gyaltsen at Nitartha Institute, Gampo Abbey, Nova Scotia, Canada, in June and July 1997.
  • Commentary by Dzogchen Ponlop Rinpoche

    This series explicates one of the principal Indian classics of the Madhyamaka tradition, Chandrakirti’s Madhyamakavatara (Entrance to the Middle Way), along with the Kagyü commentary by the eighth Karmapa, The Chariot of the Dakpo Kagyüs. These transcripts cover the Madhyamakavatara’s eleven chapters, which correlate with the ten bhumis (grounds) and the ten paramitas (perfections), plus the ultimate bhumi of buddhahood. The focus is particularly on the sixth chapter of the Madhyamakavatara, which discusses prajna (transcendental knowledge) and its realization of emptiness. Main topics include the selflessness of phenomena and the individual, and the impossibility of finding a self anywhere with the range of phenomenal experience. Includes root text by Chandrakirti and commentary by Mikyö Dorje, translated by Elizabeth M. Callahan.
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    Author: Jamgön Kongtrul Lodrö Thayé Translator: Elizabeth M. Callahan

    In Tibetan religious literature, Jamgön Kongtrül's Treasury of Knowledge in ten books stands out as a unique, encyclopedic masterpiece embodying the entire range of Buddhist teachings as it was preserved in Tibet. This volume, Frameworks of Buddhist Philosophy, is his masterful survey of the broad themes and subtle philosophical points found in more than fifteen hundred years of Buddhist philosophical writings. In a clear and systematic manner, he sets out the traditional framework of Buddhism's three vehicles and four philosophical systems, and provides an overview of the key points of each system. His syncretic approach, which emphasizes the strengths of each of the systems and incorporates them into a comprehensive picture of philosophical endeavor, is well-suited for scholar-practitioners who seek awakening through the combination of analytical inquiry and meditation.    
  • A commentary by Acharya Sherab Gyaltsen

    Root verses and commentary on An Exposition Of The Presentation of the Philosophical Systems of the Great Vehicle An Exposition that Reveals the Presentation of the Philosophical Systems of the Chittamatrikas of the Great Vehicle by Dzogchen Ponlop Rinpoche. Translated by Karl Brunnhölzl, Tyler Dewar, and Scott Wellenbach.
    • Also available as an eBook for Apple or Android devices.
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    Buddha Nature: The Mahayana Uttaratantra Shastra with Commentary by Maitreya, Jamgön Kongtrül Lodrö Tayé and Khenpo Tsültrim Gyamtso Rinpoche

    Author: Arya Maitreya Commentary: Jamgön Kongtrül Lodrö Tayé and Khenpo Tsültrim Gyamtso Rinpoche Translator: Rosemary Fuchs

    All sentient beings, without exception, have buddha nature—the inherent purity and perfection of the mind, untouched by changing mental states. Thus there is neither any reason for conceit nor self-contempt. This is obscured by veils that are removable and do not touch the inherent purity and perfection of the nature of the mind. The Mahayana Uttaratantra Shastra, one of the “Five Treatises” said to have been dictated to Asanga by the Bodhisattva Maitreya, presents the Buddha’s definitive teachings on how we should understand this ground of enlightenment and clarifies the nature and qualities of buddhahood. This seminal text details with great clarity the view that forms the basis for Vajrayana, and especially Mahamudra, practice.  
  • 2023 Updated Edition. Ebook available soon!

    Author: Dzogchen Ponlop Rinpoche, Acharya Lama Tenpa Gyaltsen, and Acharya Kelsang Wangdi Translator: Karl Brunnhölzl

    A root text written by Dzogchen Ponlop Rinpoche, Acharya Lama Tenpa Gyaltsen, and Acharya Kelsang Wangdi. It presents the divisions and definitions of the Vaibhashika and Sautrantika philosophical systems.

  • Commentary by Dzogchen Ponlop Rinpoche

    This series explicates one of the principal Indian classics of the Madhyamaka tradition, Chandrakirti’s Madhyamakavatara (Entrance to the Middle Way), along with the Kagyü commentary by the eighth Karmapa, The Chariot of the Dakpo Kagyüs. These transcripts cover the Madhyamakavatara’s eleven chapters, which correlate with the ten bhumis (grounds) and the ten paramitas (perfections), plus the ultimate bhumi of buddhahood. The focus is particularly on the sixth chapter of the Madhyamakavatara, which discusses prajna (transcendental knowledge) and its realization of emptiness. Main topics include the selflessness of phenomena and the individual, and the impossibility of finding a self anywhere with the range of phenomenal experience. Includes root text by Chandrakirti and commentary by Mikyö Dorje, translated by Elizabeth M. Callahan.
    • Also available as an eBook for Apple and Android devices.
    • The hardcopy book is shipped from the US. International customers may wish to explore local booksellers, Shambala Publications, or Amazon to save on shipping cost.

    Author: Jamgön Kongtrul Lodrö Thayé Translator & Editor: Gyurme Dorje

    Jamgön Kongtrul’s encyclopedic Treasury of Knowledge presents a complete account of the major lines of thought and practice that comprise Tibetan Buddhism. Among the ten books that make up this tour de force, Book Six is by far the longest—concisely summarizing the theoretical fields of knowledge to be studied prior to the cultivation of reflection and discriminative awareness. The first two parts of Book Six, contained in this volume, respectively concern Indo-Tibetan classical learning and Buddhist phenomenology. The former analyzes the traditional subjects of phonology and Sanskrit grammar, logic, fine art, and medicine, along with astrology, poetics, prosody, synonymics, and dramaturgy. The principal non-Buddhist philosophical systems of ancient India are then summarized and contrasted with the hierarchical meditative concentrations and formless absorptions through which the "summit of cyclic existence" can genuinely be attained. Part Two examines the phenomenological structures of Abhidharma—the shared inheritance of all Buddhist traditions—from three distinct perspectives, corresponding to the three successive turnings of the doctrinal wheel.  
  • A commentary on THE GATEWAY THAT REVEALS THE PHILOSOPHICAL SYSTEMS TO FRESH MINDS by Ācārya Sherab Gyaltsen.

  • A commentary by Āchārya Lama Tenpa Gyaltsen
  • A commentary by Ācārya Kelsang Wangdi

  • A commentary by Dzogchen Ponlop Rinpoche

    This series (Introduction to Topic 8) presents Maitreya’s Ornament of Clear Realization based on the commentary by the eighth Karmapa Mikyö Dorje, Relief of the Noble Ones. Maitreya’s work is the central Mahayana text on the stages of the path and their fruition, for both the Hinayana and Mahayana. It is traditionally summarized in seventy points, or more generally in eight chapters. Whereas the Madhyamaka literature presents the explicit meaning of the Prajnaparamita Sutras, the subject matter of the Abhisamayalamkara is the hidden or implied meaning: the various stages of bodhisattvas, shravakas, and pratyekabuddhas on the path of the meditation on emptiness, from the stage of beginner up through buddhahood. Includes root text by Maitreya and commentary by Mikyö Dorje, translated by Mitra Dr. Karl Brunnhölzl.
  • A commentary by Dzogchen Ponlop Rinpoche

    This series (Introduction to Topic 8) presents Maitreya’s Ornament of Clear Realization based on the commentary by the eighth Karmapa Mikyö Dorje, Relief of the Noble Ones. Maitreya’s work is the central Mahayana text on the stages of the path and their fruition, for both the Hinayana and Mahayana. It is traditionally summarized in seventy points, or more generally in eight chapters. Whereas the Madhyamaka literature presents the explicit meaning of the Prajnaparamita Sutras, the subject matter of the Abhisamayalamkara is the hidden or implied meaning: the various stages of bodhisattvas, shravakas, and pratyekabuddhas on the path of the meditation on emptiness, from the stage of beginner up through buddhahood. Includes root text by Maitreya and commentary by Mikyö Dorje, translated by Mitra Dr. Karl Brunnhölzl.
  • The commentary, Feast for the Fortunate, is the ninth Karmapa’s abridgement of the eighth Karmapa, Mikyö Dorje’s masterpiece, The Chariot of the Takpo Kagyü Siddhas. In it readers will find previously unavailable material on the Karmapa’s Middle Way view and a rare window into a philosophically charged era of Middle Way exposition in Tibetan Buddhism. Wangchuk Dorje’s comprehensive commentary on the Indian master Chandrakirti’s seminal text, the Madhyamakavatara, is marked by eloquent poetry, vigorous and extensive analysis, and heart instructions on breaking through the veils of confusion to independently experience the true nature of things. Includes root text and commentary by the ninth Karmapa Rangjung Dorje, translated by Tyler Dewar.
  • Commentary by Dzogchen Ponlop Rinpoche

    This series explicates one of the principal Indian classics of the Madhyamaka tradition, Chandrakirti’s Madhyamakavatara (Entrance to the Middle Way), along with the Kagyü commentary by the eighth Karmapa, The Chariot of the Dakpo Kagyüs. These transcripts cover the Madhyamakavatara’s eleven chapters, which correlate with the ten bhumis (grounds) and the ten paramitas (perfections), plus the ultimate bhumi of buddhahood. The focus is particularly on the sixth chapter of the Madhyamakavatara, which discusses prajna (transcendental knowledge) and its realization of emptiness. Main topics include the selflessness of phenomena and the individual, and the impossibility of finding a self anywhere with the range of phenomenal experience. Includes root text by Chandrakirti and commentary by Mikyö Dorje, translated by Elizabeth M. Callahan.
    • The hardcopy book is shipped from the US. International customers may wish to explore local booksellers, Shambala Publications, or Amazon to save on shipping cost, or purchase the Kindle edition.

    Author: Wangchuk Dorje Translator: Tyler Dewar

    Marked by eloquent poetry, vigorous and extensive analysis and heart instructions on breaking through the veils of confusion to independently experience the true nature of things, The Karmapa's Middle Way contains the Ninth Karmapa Wangchuk Dorje's comprehensive commentary on the Indian master Chandrakirti's seminal text, the Madhyamakavatara or Entrance to the Middle Way. This commentary, Feast for the Fortunate, is the Ninth Karmapa's abridgement of the Eighth Karmapa Mikyo Dorje's masterpiece, the Chariot of the Takpo Kagyu Siddhas. In it, readers will find previously unavailable material on the Karmapa's Middle Way view and a rare window into a philosophically charged era of Middle Way exposition in Tibetan Buddhism. Chandrakirti and the Karmapa present in precise detail the vital Buddhist concept of emptiness through which the Mahayana path of compassionate altruism becomes complete. Introductory material, copious footnotes, appendices, and a reader-centric approach to the language will make this volume equally accessible to the seasoned scholar of Indo-Tibetan Buddhism and the newly curious nonspecialist alike.    
    • Also available as an eBook for Apple and Android devices.
    • Limited supply.
    • The hardcopy book is shipped from the US. International customers may wish to explore local booksellers, Shambala Publications, or Amazon to save on shipping cost.
    Author: Asaṅga

    Translator: Karl Brunnhölzl

    Winner of the Khyentse Foundation Prize for Outstanding Translation. The first complete English translation of Asaṅga's Mahāyānasaṃgraha, the most important and comprehensive Indian Yogācāra text, and all its available Indian commentaries. The Mahāyānasaṃgraha, published here with its Indian and Tibetan commentaries in three volumes, presents virtually everything anybody might want to know about the Yogācāra School of mahāyāna Buddhism. It discusses in detail the nature and operation of the eight kinds of consciousness, the often-misunderstood notion of “mind only” (cittamātra), dependent origination, the cultivation of the path and its fruition in terms of the four wisdoms, and the three bodies (kāyas) of a buddha. Volume 1 presents the translation of the Mahāyānasaṃgraha along with a commentary by Vasubandhu. The introduction gives an overview of the text and its Indian and Tibetan commentaries, and explains in detail two crucial elements of the Yogācāra view: the ālaya-consciousness and the afflicted mind (kliṣṭamanas). Volume 2 presents translations of the commentary by Asvabhāva and an anonymous Indian commentary on the first chapter of the text. These translations are supplemented in the endnotes by excerpts from Tibetan commentaries and related passages in other Indian and Chinese Yogācāra works. Volume 3 includes appendices with excerpts from other Indian and Chinese Yogācāra texts and supplementary materials on major Yogācāra topics in the Mahāyānasaṃgraha.    
  • This text is published as part of the Nītārtha Institute study program directed by The Dzogchen Ponlop Rinpoche. Commentary Commentary on In Praise of Dharmadhātu © 2009 by The Dzogchen Ponlop Rinpoche and Nītārtha international. Root Text Root stanzas from first edition draft translation of In Praise of Dharmadhātu translated by Karl Brunnhölzl. © 2005 Karl Brunnhölzl and Nītārtha Institute. All rights reserved. Printed in Canada. No part of this book may be used or reproduced in any manner whatsoever without written permission. First Draft Edition 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 This transcript was produced from a series of talks given by The Dzogchen Ponlop Rinpoche at Nītārtha Institute, Queen Margaret’s School, Duncan, British Columbia in July and August 2005. For further information contact: info@nitarthainstitute.org Acknowledgments This edition was generously sponsored by the Tsadra Foundation Translated by Karl Brunnhölzl Transcribed by Amanda Brown, Lisa Gardener, Susan McConnell, Tom Norris, and Sasha Persits Edited by Amanda Brown, Ryan Jones, and Tashi Wangmo Designed by Tashi Wangmo
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    Authors: Tsangnyön Heruka and Milarepa Translator: Christopher Stagg

    An authoritative new translation of the complete Hundred Thousand Songs of Milarepa, the teaching songs and stories from Tibet's most beloved Buddhist yogi, poet, and saint. Powerful and deeply inspiring, there is no book more beloved by Tibetans than The Hundred Thousand Songs, and no figure more revered than Milarepa, the great eleventh-century poet and saint. An ordinary man who, through sheer force of effort, faith, and perseverance, overcame nearly insurmountable obstacles on the spiritual path to achieve enlightenment in a single lifetime, he stands as an exemplar of what it is to lead a spiritual life. Milarepa, a cotton-clad yogi, wandered and taught the dharma, most famously through spontaneously composed songs, a colorful and down-to-earth way to convey the immediacy and depth of the Buddhist teachings. In this work, the songs are woven into a narrative that tells the stories of his most famous encounters with his students, including Gampopa and Rechungpa, and recount his victories over supernatural forces in the remote Himalayan mountains and caves where he meditated. In this authoritative new translation, prepared under the guidance of Dzogchen Ponlop Rinpoche, Christopher Stagg brilliantly brings to life the teachings of this extraordinary man. This classic of world literature is important for its narrative alone but is also a key contribution for those who seek inspiration for the spiritual path.
    Tsangnyön Heruka (1452-1507), or the "Madman of Tsang," so named for his eccentric behavior in yogic practice, compiled and arranged this most well-known collection of Milarepa’s songs four centuries after the death of the great yogin. Tsangnyön spent much of his life wandering in the same Himalayan regions as Milarepa and was considered by some to be his emanation.
      Christopher Stagg served as a translator and interpreter for the Nitartha Institute and Nalandabodhi, both under the direction of Dzogchen Ponlop Rinpoche. Also trained as a public school music teacher.
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    Author: Karmapa Ogyen Trinley Dorje

    If you are inspired to take up his challenge, the Karmapa offers a path for participating in a global community that is based on compassion. In these chapters, he shares his vision for bringing social action into daily life, on a scale we can realistically manage through the choices we make every day—what to buy, what to eat, and how to relate honestly and bravely with our friends and family and coworkers. His fresh and encouraging perspective shows us that we have the strength to live with kindness in the midst of the many challenges we face as socially and environmentally conscious beings. Because he sees the world through the lens of the interdependence of all beings, he sees that humans can change social and environmental problems by changing their attitudes and actions. And so, he shows ways that we can change our world by changing ourselves—by examining our own habits of consumption and by being willing to look into how our food reaches our table and how the products we buy are made. In his chapter on gender, he points out that we don’t have to label others according to a social construct.

    If his viewpoint seems optimistic, it is—and it’s also demanding. The Karmapa calls on us to open our mind and heart to the innumerable connections we share with others—in our families, communities, social systems, and on our planet. Thanks to the depth of his spiritual training, and the breadth of his curiosity about the world and his love for it, he presents a relevant framework for understanding what it means to be human now—and why it’s imperative that we concern ourselves with the well-being of all others. He points to a world we can create through our own effort, using a resource we already have in abundance—the basic nobility of our human heart.   The 17th Gyalwang Karmapa, Ogyen Trinley Dorje, is the spiritual head of one of the major schools of Tibetan Buddhism. The 900-year-old lineage of Karmapas has included some of Tibet’s greatest spiritual masters. Born to nomadic parents in rural Tibet, he was identified while still a young child as the heir to this leadership position. In 2000, the Karmapa’s dramatic escape to India from Chinese-ruled Tibet at the age of fourteen propelled him onto the world stage. Since then, he has emerged as an international Buddhist leader and environmental activist, founding Khoryug, a region-wide environmental protection program. The Karmapa has been dubbed the "new face of Tibetan Buddhism," and many Tibetans look to the Karmapa for inspiration in their struggle to preserve their embattled culture. In 2008, he made his historic first visit to America. 
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    Author: Mitra Dr. Karl Brunnhölzl

    A guide to the famous Heart Sūtra that reveals the tenderness and compassion underlying the striking rhetoric of this popular Buddhist text The radical message of the Heart Sūtra, one of Buddhism’s most famous texts, is a sweeping attack on everything we hold most dear: our troubles, the world as we know it, even the teachings of the Buddha himself. Several of the Buddha’s followers are said to have suffered heart attacks and died when they first heard its assertion of the basic groundlessness of our existence—hence the title of this book. Overcoming fear, the Buddha teaches, is not to be accomplished by shutting down or building walls around oneself, but instead by opening up to understand the illusory nature of everything we fear—including ourselves. In this book of teachings, Karl Brunnhölzl guides practitioners through this ‘crazy’ sutra to the wisdom and compassion that lie at its core.   Karl Brunnhölzl, MD, was trained as a physician and also studied Tibetology. He received his systematic training in Tibetan language and Buddhist philosophy and practice at the Marpa Institute for Translators, founded by Khenpo Tsultrim Gyamtso Rinpoche. Since 1989 he has been a translator and interpreter from Tibetan and English. He is presently involved with the Nitartha Institute as a teacher and translator.  
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    Translator: Mitra Dr. Karl Brunnhölzl

    The Abhisamayalamkara summarizes all the topics in the vast body of the praj aparamita sutras. Resembling a zip-file, it comes to life only through its Indian and Tibetan commentaries. Together, these texts not only discuss the "hidden meaning" of the praj aparamita sutras--the paths and bhumis of sravakas, pratyekabuddhas, and bodhisattvas--but also serve as contemplative manuals for the explicit topic of these sutras--emptiness--and how it is to be understood on the progressive levels of realization of bodhisattvas. Thus these texts describe what happens in the mind of a bodhisattva who meditates on emptiness, making it a living experience from the beginner's stage up through buddhahood.

    Groundless Paths contains the first in-depth study of the Abhisamayalamkara (the text studied most extensively in higher Tibetan Buddhist education) and its commentaries from the perspective of the Nyingma School of Tibetan Buddhism. This study consists mainly of translations of Maitreya's famous text and two commentaries on it by Patrul Rinpoche. These are supplemented by three short texts on the paths and bhumis by the same author, as well as extensive excerpts from commentaries by six other Nyingma masters, including Mipham Rinpoche. Thus this book helps close a long-standing gap in the modern scholarship on the praj aparamita sutras and the literature on paths and bhumis in mahayana Buddhism.

    Arya Maitreya's Ornament of Clear Realization, with its Indian and Tibetan commentaries, presents the complex dynamics of the path to liberation as a succession of realizations of the empty nature of all phenomena. This presentation is a powerful antidote to whatever two-dimensional views we might hold about spiritual experience and the journey to enlightenment.

     

    Karl Brunnhölzl, MD, was trained as a physician and also studied Tibetology. He received his systematic training in Tibetan language and Buddhist philosophy and practice at the Marpa Institute for Translators, founded by Khenpo Tsultrim Gyamtso Rinpoche. Since 1989 he has been a translator and interpreter from Tibetan and English. He is presently involved with the Nitartha Institute as a teacher and translator.

     

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    Author: Dzogchen Ponlop Rinpoche

    In the Nyingma School of Tibetan Buddhism, the Great Perfection is considered the most profound and direct path to enlightenment. The instructions of this tradition present a spiritual shortcut--a radically direct approach that cuts through confusion and lays bare the mind's true nature of luminous purity. For centuries, these teachings have been taught and practiced in secret by some of the greatest adepts of the Buddhist tradition. Great Perfection: Outer and Inner Preliminaries contains detailed instructions on the foundational practices of this tradition, from "The Excellent Chariot," a practice manual compiled by the Third Dzogchen Rinpoche. Distilling the teachings of the Heart Essence of the Dakinis into an accessible, easy-to-practice format, The Excellent Chariotleads the reader through the entire Buddhist path, starting with basic Buddhist contemplations that work to dislodge deeply ingrained patterns of thinking and behaving, and continuing on to the most advanced and secret meditative practices of the Great Perfection. The teachings in this volume are drawn largely from the writings of the great Nyingma master Longchenpa and the root texts of the Heart Essence of the Dakinis itself. The Third Dzogchen Rinpoche begins by discussing the correct way to study and practice the Great Perfection teachings before presenting an overview of the Great Perfection lineage and an explanation on the meaning and importance of empowerment. In the chapters that follow, he presents practical instructions on the outer and inner preliminaries, the so-called "ng ndro" practices. These practices enable the practitioner to transform and purify the mind, preparing it for the advanced Great Perfection meditation of Trekch and T gal, the breakthrough and direct leap. In addition to the translation mentioned above, Great Perfection: Outer and Inner Preliminaries contains a beautiful introduction by the Dzogchen Ponlop Rinpoche, a contemporary Great Perfection master, and an extensive glossary of key Great Perfection terminology. The Heart Essence Series presents translations of seminal writings on the Great Perfection. Beginning with the works of the Heart Essence of the Dakinis and the Heart Essence of Vimalamitra, two cycles that lie at the core of the Great Perfection lineage, the series aims to provide scholars, teachers, and practitioners of these profound teachings with accurate and readable translations of the most important Great Perfection texts. Great Perfection: Separation and Breakthrough, a companion volume of restricted teachings, is also available, containing advanced teachings on the separation or rushen practices and the breakthrough stage of Great Perfection meditation. The Third Dzogchen Rinpoche (1759-1792) was the abbot of Dzogchen Monastery, one of the largest monastic centers in eastern Tibet. He was known particularly for his mastery of the Great Perfection teachings and his clear and accessible works on this topic.
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    Translator: Mitra Dr. Karl Brunnhölzl

    The Abhisamayalamkara summarizes all the topics in the vast body of the Prajnaparamita Sutras. Resembling a zip-file, it comes to life only through its Indian and Tibetan commentaries. Together, these texts not only discuss the "hidden meaning" of the Prajnaparamita Sutras—the paths and bhumis of sravakas, pratyekabuddhas, and bodhisattvas—but also serve as contemplative manuals for the explicit topic of these sutras—emptiness—and how it is to be understood on the progressive levels of realization of bodhisattvas. Thus these texts describe what happens in the mind of a bodhisattva who meditates on emptiness, making it a living experience from the beginner's stage up through buddhahood.  Gone Beyond contains the first in-depth study of the Abhisamayalamkara (the text studied most extensively in higher Tibetan Buddhist education) and its commentaries in the Kagyu School. This study (in two volumes) includes translations of Maitreya's famous text and its commentary by the Fifth Shamarpa Goncho Yenla (the first translation ever of a complete commentary on the Abhisamayalamkara into English), which are supplemented by extensive excerpts from the commentaries by the Third, Seventh, and Eighth Karmapas and others. Thus it closes a long-standing gap in the modern scholarship on the Prajnaparamita Sutras and the literature on paths and bhumis in mahayana Buddhism.  The first volume presents an English translation of the first three chapters of the Abhisamayalamkara and its commentary by the Fifth Shamarpa. The second volume presents an English translation of the final five chapters and its commentary by the Fifth Shamarpa.   Karl Brunnhölzl, MD, was trained as a physician and also studied Tibetology. He received his systematic training in Tibetan language and Buddhist philosophy and practice at the Marpa Institute for Translators, founded by Khenpo Tsultrim Gyamtso Rinpoche. Since 1989 he has been a translator and interpreter from Tibetan and English. He is presently involved with the Nitartha Institute as a teacher and translator.
    • The hardcopy book is shipped from the US. International customers may wish to explore local booksellers, Shambala Publications, or Amazon to save on shipping cost.

    Translator: Mitra Dr. Karl Brunnhölzl

    The Abhisamayalamkara summarizes all the topics in the vast body of the Prajnaparamita Sutras. Resembling a zip-file, it comes to life only through its Indian and Tibetan commentaries. Together, these texts not only discuss the "hidden meaning" of the Prajnaparamita Sutras—the paths and bhumis of sravakas, pratyekabuddhas, and bodhisattvas—but also serve as contemplative manuals for the explicit topic of these sutras—emptiness—and how it is to be understood on the progressive levels of realization of bodhisattvas. Thus these texts describe what happens in the mind of a bodhisattva who meditates on emptiness, making it a living experience from the beginner's stage up through buddhahood. Gone Beyond contains the first in-depth study of the Abhisamayalamkara (the text studied most extensively in higher Tibetan Buddhist education) and its commentaries in the Kagyu School. This study (in two volumes) includes translations of Maitreya's famous text and its commentary by the Fifth Shamarpa Goncho Yenla (the first translation ever of a complete commentary on the Abhisamayalamkara into English), which are supplemented by extensive excerpts from the commentaries by the Third, Seventh, and Eighth Karmapas and others. Thus it closes a long-standing gap in the modern scholarship on the Prajnaparamita Sutras and the literature on paths and bhumis in mahayana Buddhism. The first volume presents an English translation of the first three chapters of the Abhisamayalamkara and its commentary by the Fifth Shamarpa. The second volume presents an English translation of the final five chapters and its commentary by the Fifth Shamarpa.   Karl Brunnhölzl, MD, was trained as a physician and also studied Tibetology. He received his systematic training in Tibetan language and Buddhist philosophy and practice at the Marpa Institute for Translators, founded by Khenpo Tsultrim Gyamtso Rinpoche. Since 1989 he has been a translator and interpreter from Tibetan and English. He is presently involved with the Nitartha Institute as a teacher and translator.
    • The hardcopy book is shipped from the US. International customers may wish to explore local booksellers, Shambala Publications, or Amazon to save on shipping cost.

    Author: Dzogchen Ponlop Rinpoche

    In this life-changing book, acclaimed Buddhist teacher Dzogchen Ponlop Rinpoche shows how to free yourself from being a victim of your emotions by gaining the awareness and understanding that will help you harness their power. Emotions bring color and meaning to our lives, but they can also put us on an exhausting rollercoaster ride that takes us to blissful peak states, the depths of delusion and despair, and everything in between. It is only by learning to relate to our emotions skillfully that we benefit from their richness and glean wisdom, rather than letting them control us. Emotions get their power from a simple but deep-seated source: our lack of self-knowledge. When we bring awareness to our experience of emotions, something truly amazing happens—they lose their power to make us miserable. In this book, Rinpoche leads us through the three steps of his Emotional Rescue Plan. Mindful Gap is the practice of creating a safe distance between you and your emotions, which gives you the psychological space to work with their energy. Clear Seeing involves recognizing the bigger picture. Last, Letting Go is the practice of releasing stressful physical and emotional energy through exercise, relaxation, and awareness. With each step, we become increasingly familiar with the inner workings of our emotions, seeing straight to the heart of anger, fear, passion, jealousy, and pride. With time and practice, instead of leading us astray, our emotions become our guide towards living a more compassionate, creative, and fulfilling life.   Dzogchen Ponlop Rinpoche is a widely celebrated Buddhist teacher and the author of Rebel Buddha: A Guide to a Revolution of Mind. ("Rinpoche" is an honorific reserved for highly respected Buddhist teachers.) He is the founder and president of Nalandabodhi, an international network of Buddhist centers.
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    Author: Bötrül Translator: Douglas Samuel Duckworth

    An annotated translation of an essential work of twentieth-century Tibetan Buddhist thought, one that explicates teachings on the Middle Way.

    This is an essential work of Tibetan Buddhist thought written by an influential scholar of the twentieth century. From the same Nyingma school as the great Tibetan philosopher Mipam, Botrul in this text provides a systematic overview of Mipam’s teachings on the Middle Way. Presenting the Nyingma tradition within a rich constellation of diverse perspectives, Botrul contrasts Nyingma views point-by-point with positions held by other Tibetan schools. Botrul’s work addresses a wide range of complex topics in Buddhist doctrine in a beautifully structured composition in verse and prose. Notably, Botrul sheds light on the elusive meaning of "emptiness" and presents an interpretation that is unique to his Nyingma school. Distinguishing the Views and Philosophies exemplifies the vigorous tradition of Tibetan Buddhist scholarship and is widely studied in the contemporary monastic colleges of Tibet, India, and Nepal. Douglas Samuel Duckworth’s translation will make this work widely available in English for the first time, and his thoughtful commentary will provide insight and context for readers. Bötrül (1898-1959) was an ordained monk from central Tibet, who was recognized as an incarnate lama. He taught at several monastic colleges in eastern and central Tibet, and many of his students were among the most influential leaders of the Nyingma school.   Douglas Samuel Duckworth is Assistant Professor of Philosophy and Humanities at East Tennessee State University. He is the author of Mipam on Buddha-Nature: The Ground of the Nyingma Tradition, also published by SUNY Press.
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  • A commentary by Āchārya Lama Tenpa Gyaltsen

    This series (Introduction to Topic 8) presents Maitreya’s Ornament of Clear Realization based on the commentary by the eighth Karmapa Mikyö Dorje, Relief of the Noble Ones. Maitreya’s work is the central Mahayana text on the stages of the path and their fruition, for both the Hinayana and Mahayana. It is traditionally summarized in seventy points, or more generally in eight chapters. Whereas the Madhyamaka literature presents the explicit meaning of the Prajnaparamita Sutras, the subject matter of the Abhisamayalamkara is the hidden or implied meaning: the various stages of bodhisattvas, shravakas, and pratyekabuddhas on the path of the meditation on emptiness, from the stage of beginner up through buddhahood. Includes root text by Maitreya and commentary by Mikyö Dorje, translated by Mitra Dr. Karl Brunnhölzl.
  • A commentary by Ācārya Lama Tenpa Gyaltsen

    This series (Introduction to Topic 8)  presents Maitreya’s Ornament of Clear Realization based on the commentary by the eighth Karmapa Mikyö Dorje, Relief of the Noble Ones. Maitreya’s work is the central Mahayana text on the stages of the path and their fruition, for both the Hinayana and Mahayana. It is traditionally summarized in seventy points, or more generally in eight chapters. Whereas the Madhyamaka literature presents the explicit meaning of the Prajnaparamita Sutras, the subject matter of the Abhisamayalamkara is the hidden or implied meaning: the various stages of bodhisattvas, shravakas, and pratyekabuddhas on the path of the meditation on emptiness, from the stage of beginner up through buddhahood. Includes root text by Maitreya and commentary by Mikyö Dorje, translated by Mitra Dr. Karl Brunnhölzl.
  • Traducción del tibetano al inglés por Karl Brunnhölzl Traducción del inglés al español por Israel Lifshitz

    Un texto raíz escrito por Khenpo Tsültrim Gyamtso Rinpoche. Presenta las divisiones y definiciones de los tipos de mente identificados en la tradición epistemológica de Dignāga y Dharmakīrti.

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